THE WANDERING FALCON BY JAMEEL AHMAD

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Ayesha Afzal

Abstract

In this extraordinary tale, Tor Baz, the young boy descended from both chiefs and outlaws who becomes the Wandering Falcon, moves between the tribes of Pakistan and Afghanistan and their uncertain worlds full of brutality, humanity, deep love, honor, poverty, and grace.


The Wandering Falcon begins with a young couple, refugees from their tribe, who have traveled to the middle of nowhere to escape the cruel punishments meted out upon those who transgress the boundaries of marriage and family. Their son, Tor Baz, descended from both chiefs and outlaws, becomes "The Wandering Falcon," a character who travels among the tribes, over the mountains and the plains, into the towns and the tents that constitute the homes of the tribal people. The media today speak about this unimaginably remote region, a geopolitical hotbed of conspiracies, drone attacks, and conflict, but in the rich, dramatic tones of a master storyteller, this stunning, honor-bound culture is revealed from the inside.


This research is qualitative in nature. It analyzes Jamil Ahmad’s The Wandering Falcon in the light of Victor Turner’s theory of liminality. The aim of the research is to find out whether the inception of the concept of liminality in the lives of the dislocated threshold people verifies to be a successful coping mechanism for them to survive in this hash and ruthless environment. The main focus of the research is on analyzing of the Communities vs. structure, portrayal of liminal existence, and different forms of boundaries.


The character of Tor Baz, the protagonist is best defined by William Glasser’s definition of humanity. Humanity is “driven by five genetic needs: survival, love, belonging, power and freedom”, all these needs are portrayed in the book predominantly in the character of Tor Baz. Tor Baz is a thematic protagonist. He appears in almost all of the stories but not as a hero, as a survivor. His survival is made possible because of his liminal existence. He never attaches himself with any tribe so he becomes a part of all the tribes. He becomes universal.

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How to Cite
Ayesha Afzal. (2021). THE WANDERING FALCON BY JAMEEL AHMAD. International Bulletin of Theology and Civilization, 1(2), 12-16. https://doi.org/10.51506/ibtc.v1i2.183